There seems to be a lot of destruction happening in the world with the recent hurricanes and the fires in California. Even though these haven’t physically affected our area, they do affect us.

Photo by: Karl Mondon/ Bay Area News Group Some structures of Chateau St. Jean were damaged, but the winery survived. Photo taken from Wine Spectator

Photo by: Karl Mondon/ Bay Area News Group

Some structures of Chateau St. Jean were damaged, but the winery survived. Photo taken from Wine Spectator

On October 8, fires sparked and over the course of a few weeks, destroyed Northern California. These fires have caused fatalities, evacuations, and severe damage to homes and businesses. California is a leading area for wine and because of the fires, people not only lost their homes but their businesses too. What matters most is that these people are safe. As of October 20, there were 11 wineries that have been destroyed or severely damaged. While most of the fires are at least 80% contained at this point, the damage done to some 210,000 acres of land is going to take a while to build back up. 

The Tubbs fire path, which was one of the largest fires- along with Atlas Peak fire, is said to have destroyed eight vineyards, estimating a total of 90 acres of vines. Robert Michael Mondavi Jr., of Michael Mondavi Family Estate, said that one of his vineyards was scorched by flames and the fruit was lost. 

"Our organic Atlas Peak vineyard had 95 percent burn-through,” he told Wine Spectator via email. “We don’t use herbicides, we mow. So the stubble burned, causing damage to end posts and irrigation lines. A few spots had no burn and we tried crushing those grapes. However, it released so much aroma of smoke we had to stop. This resulted in 100 percent crop loss from Animo for the 2017 vintage." -Wine Spectator 
Photo by: Courtesy Michael Mondavi Family Estate Scorched ground and shriveled grapes were left behind at Michael Mondavi's Atlas Peak vineyard. Photo taken from Wine Spectator

Photo by: Courtesy Michael Mondavi Family Estate

Scorched ground and shriveled grapes were left behind at Michael Mondavi's Atlas Peak vineyard. Photo taken from Wine Spectator

When the fires began, the vineyard was safe and they tried to harvest the fruit as fast as they could, but within 20 minutes, the wind had shifted and it was no longer safe. 

“At least 11 wineries have been confirmed significantly or totally damaged—six in Napa, including Patland Vineyards, Roy Estate, Signorello Estate, VinRoc, Sill Family and White Rock Vineyards; Sonoma's Paradise Ridge Vineyards and Helena View Johnston and Mendocino's Oster, Frey Vineyards and Backbone Vineyard & Winery.” -Wine Spectator

Our first and foremost concern is the people of this area. Below is a list of ways you can help. 

Read about which wineries are participating and how to help Click here. 

  • Flying Goat winery in Santa Barbara is donating $10 for every bottle of Pinot Noir Salisbury Vineyard 2011 ($38) sold, through Oct. 31, to the Direct Relief fund. You can purchase the wine on their website.

We can't help but think about the future of some of the wineries. The destruction of 11 wineries seems like a small number when you think of the entire Napa and Sonoma area. We know that many owners and wine makers will be deeply affected and wineries possibly ruined because of the fires. This year's harvest at most vineyards was an early one, which is a bit of good news because that means most varietals are already in tanks and will be fine. But the one grape left on the vine a little while longer is the staple varietal of this area, Cabernet Sauvignon. If the vine was not burned, the smoke in the area has affected the grape. There are some methods that wineries will use to soften the smoke in these grapes, but some might be too far gone. Greg Kitchens, Napa native and director of winemaking for Don Sebastiani & Sons, whose properties in both Napa and Sonoma were fortunately spared, thinks that there is no reason to worry about the wines from this area. Some places will have setbacks if the vines have been completely destroyed and have to be replanted, but it will not make these areas lose their status or make their wines unworthy of being drunk in the future. 

The best thing that we can do for this area going forward is to support it. Buy their wines, plan a trip, and help this economy get back on their feet!